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SCAM: A mouse-over of any link in these emails reveals that they do not point to the website they claim to represent. [View the lower left corner of each graphic.] Most of these emails typically point to fake websites that are designed to look like the business website but they are fake. These are called phishing sites. Victims give away their login credentials for their real accounts when the try to log into these fake sites. Some of these scams try to trick the recipient into revealing their credit card information.  And finally, some of these emails contain links that point the recipient to a "drive-by download." Arriving on the website triggers a script that will infect the visitor's computer with malware.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Besides looking at the link revealed in the lower left corner of most of these scams by a mouse-over, notice that nearly all of these emails lack any personal information that identifies the recipient. None of the credit card emails, for example, identify the last 4 digits of the recipient’s credit card.

CAUTION: We do not advise visiting the links revealed in these scam emails because it is possible that some of these websites might cause a computer infection.

The first three examples are phishing attempts to steal login credentials by tricking the recipient into logging into a fake Craig’s List web page. Example #1: “We need help resolving an issue with your account” A mouse-over of the link reveals that points to “cl-flag-terms.ucoz.com.” Ucoz.com is a service for creating free websites. Example #2: […]

Example #1: “Verify your new email address” These scammers have a sense of humor. A mouse-over of the “Confirm” link shows that it points to a website named “iskum.com.” Example #2: “Shipping Confirmation” …for something you didn’t order. That will get your attention! This is a fine example of social engineering. Most people’s response would […]

Sample #1: “Your order ID has been successfully cancelled” A simple mouse-over reveals that the link points to “fepar.es.”  “.es” is the 2-letter country code for Spain (España).

Sample #1: “Your PayPal Account Will Close Soon!” English is not this scammer’s first language as evidenced by “Relog in your account” as well as other phrases. Also, a mouse-over of the link reveals a very long Internet address that begins with “paypal.com-us.cgi-bin”  Just because an address contains “paypal.com” doesn’t make it so.  Actually, this […]

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