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Financial

SCAM: A mouse-over of any link in these emails reveals that they do not point to the website they claim to represent. [View the lower left corner of each graphic.] These types of emails either point to fake websites that are designed to look like the real financial institution, called phishing sites, or simply lead to sites that cause a computer infection. If it is a phishing site, victims are tricked into giving away their login credentials for their real accounts when they log into these fake sites. Some phishing websites are so clever that when the victim logs into the phishing site, the fake site will use the information and forward them to the real site AND log them into the account. The victims therefore have no idea they have been phished. Some of the emails offer attached files to click on or download. Most of these types of emails contain malware and are very dangerous as a result.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Besides looking at the link revealed in the lower left corner of most of these scams by a mouse-over, notice that nearly all of these emails lack any personal information that identifies the recipient. None of the emails, for example, identify account information of the recipient's account. They typically don't contain ANY personal information at all!

CAUTION: We do not advise visiting the links revealed in these scam emails because it is possible that some of these websites might cause a computer infection.

Mouse-overs reveal the scams in these emails. However, some links point to “.exe” files. These are Windows-based executable programs that will download, install and launch on your computer. They should be considered VERY dangerous.

Mouse-overs reveal the scams in these emails. However, some links point to “.exe” files. These are Windows-based executable programs that will download, install and launch on your computer. They should be considered VERY dangerous.

Sample #1: “Thank you for entrusting Charles Schwab & Co. with your investments” A mouse-over easily reveals the fraud in this email.

Anytime you receive a stock tip that is about to increase in value, it is a sure sign that you’re about to lose your shirt!  Just delete. Sample #1: Stock tips from strangers. Sounds like reliable information to us!

s2Member®